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Surviving a Tornado on Holy Ground

By Harold Klemp

“Donna” was going to have a new telecommunications company install their system in her home. She was switching companies. So one day a young phone rep came to her home. “Brian” was his name. She took him to her office and let him size up the place—see what kind of equipment she had, and decide what to do about it.

In the meantime, Donna was running around as quick as she could, straightening things up, moving things here and there, because it was her office, and it was cluttered. Brian looked around. Donna had all kinds of stuff in there. She had watercolors, art reproductions, road maps, photos of famous groups (I don’t know of what—musicians?). And then bookcases overloaded with Chinese medicine books and medicine.

Brian asked, “What’s E-C-K?” Well, the name of her new telecommunications company was spelled out in letters too, and so she was thinking of the alphabet—E-C-K. She couldn’t tune in right away. Then he pointed to the chart with the ECK Masters on it and asked, “Those Masters, who are they?” Donna said, “Those are my teachers.”

Then she told him all about HU and about the Mahanta, who is the Inner Master, and so on. She told him the whole works. He said, “You know, I’ve got a story I’d like to tell you.” He then told about his experience with the tornado in Moore, Oklahoma, on May 20, way back in 2013.

He was in his home when the warnings came. The first thing he did was get his family in the car. They said, “We’re going to run away from this. We’re not staying here.” Because it was reported to be quite a large tornado. So they took off driving. But everything was gridlocked. They couldn’t go anywhere. Brian didn’t know what to do, so he went back home.

He unloaded his wife, two babies, his mother, and grandmother. He got them inside, into a safe utility room. He took pillows, comforters, and mattresses, and he put everything he could think of on top of them to protect them.

Then he got a nudge to go outside. Men are like that. They always like to go out there and take a good look—one last look. They don’t know if it’s going to be their last look. They don’t care; they don’t think about that. They’re just going out to get a look, as if they’re going to do something about it.

He went out there, and the vortex of this tornado was about the length of two football fields away. That’s pretty close, about two hundred yards or so. He threw his arms up into the sky and said, “Oh, God, please have mercy on these people. They’re good people. All they’ve got is their homes. Be kind to them, would you?” And then he said, “Well, I think it’s time to get inside now.”

He raced inside, and they heard the horrible noise of the tornado pass over and go through. And then, when it all got quiet again, he went outside and looked. His neighbors, his neighborhood, the whole block—everybody and everything was fine, as if nothing had happened. Then he looked at the fences between the homes that separated one property from the other. These things were knocked flat. And he stood there, wondering, Now, how did this happen?

It was a serious storm. Twenty-four people were killed. The winds had been 210 miles per hour, and the path on the ground was one and a third miles wide. Now, this was a big vacuum sweeper. It was one of the strongest tornadoes on record.

When he finished telling the story, Brian was smiling and bemused, puzzled. He said, “What do you make of that?” In the meantime, before he had come here to Donna’s house, this experience had set him to searching. Somehow he figured it tied in with karma. His church hadn’t taught him about karma or anything, but he knew karma. And he thought, Yeah, it played a part.

Because there had to be some reason this neighborhood was spared. No, he didn’t go around patting himself on the back and saying, “Hey, God heard me. God heard me!” No, he didn’t get the big head. He had just said they are good people. So God spared them. But he had known also about karma, and he suspected there was more to this.

He had heard about Eckankar in the past, but he hadn’t ever paid much mind. But now he accepted the HU card that Donna gave him, as well as some other ECK materials. He was glad to accept them because, I suppose, he wanted to find out more about when he had been on holy ground.

I enjoy having a chance to pass some of your stories along.

Excerpt from The Master’s Talks in A Year of Spiritual Healing—2014–15.

One Response to Surviving a Tornado on Holy Ground

  1. Vanessa Moreno says:

    I am thankful because The Mahanta protected to my uncle and his wife, his mother in law in some huracanes in Puerto Rico the last year, my home in 2009 during a little tornado and another aunt years before to become eckist. I felt protection of someone special like a angel guard in the past…I realized now this was The Mahanta.. Love this kind of stories because I lived.

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